I practice meditation

Here’s a free printable I made to explain to children how to meditate.

Teachers and parents, you can download it here and print it for school or home use (no commercial uses allowed).

For more free printable posters, visit my boutique in the “free printable stuff” section. To see my books, click here. If you want to license this image, contact my agent (Contact form above).

Open-minded people are happier

Here’s a free printable comic I made to let kids know that developing curiosity and empathy for people who don’t have the same life experience will probably make them fell better. People who are open and curious about diversity are generally happier, less anxious and healthier, because constantly feeling threatened is exhausting!

To open your mind, you can:

• Talk to people who live different lives
• Read tons of books from diverse authors
• Don’t take your first impressions too seriously and always consider that you might be wrong
• Try to find things that you have in common with most people you meet.

Teachers and parents, you can download it here and print it for school or home use (no commercial uses allowed).

For more free printable posters, visit my boutique in the “free printable stuff” section. To see my books, click here. If you want to license this image, contact my agent (Contact form above).

Anger can hide other emotions

Here’s a free printable I made to explain to children that often, anger is there to protect other vulnerable or difficult feelings and emotions, such as fear, sadness, frustration, pain, or shame. Anger is a valid and important emotion, but it often protects

Teachers and parents, you can download it here and print it for school or home use (no commercial uses allowed).

For more free printable posters, visit my boutique in the “free printable stuff” section. To see my books, click here. If you want to license this image, contact my agent (Contact form above).

Killer underwear invasion!

Here’s my latest book on disinformation, media literacy and conspiracy theories: Killer underwear invasion!


Two jellybean–shaped creatures, one blue, one pink, delve into the intricacies and duplicity behind one of the most insidious and pervasive issues of our time, and the first chapter of this middle-grade comic dives right in: “What Is Fake News?” Gravel does a fine job breaking down complex ideas, beginning with the definition of news (“information about important stuff that’s happening in the world right now”) and explaining that while disinformation is not new (“Hear ye, hear ye! An evil magician turned the king into a goat!”), the internet and other modern technologies have made it much easier to make lies look real and to intentionally spread them. The hows and whys are explored using specific, goofy fictional case studies; and people’s motives (e.g., “Reason 1: To make money…Reason 2: To make money and get famous,” etc.) are plainly laid out. Though the examples aren’t necessarily serious, the consequences are: “So far, I have given you a bunch of silly examples of fake news,” says the pink protagonist, “but fake news is not funny at all. It can actually be very dangerous.” The tone is non-blame-y of consumers (but not purveyors) of fake news, with acknowledgment of the ease of being duped (“Admit it—you’d be curious, too”) and useful advice about thinking critically, examining sources, etc. Well-delineated panel illustrations featuring blobby critters and pastel colors make these thorny concepts relatively easy to get and should leave many readers feeling empowered.- ELISSA GERSHOWITZ, Horn Book

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This middle grade graphic nonfiction is an ingenious introduction to media literacy for kids. Using humor and super fun illustrations, author and illustrator Elise Gravel shows how kids can spot fake news and conspiracy theories. This is a must in today’s news cycle, where so much absolute nonsense is passed off as news. I used to teach introductory research and writing to college Freshmen, and if this book had existed then, I probably would’ve had them read it! At the same time, my 4-year-old enjoyed reading excerpts for the illustrations and silly jokes. It’s a really fantastic, accessible introduction that would work great in middle school classrooms. – Margaret Kingsbury, Book Riot

What is peer review?

Here’s a free printable I made to explain to young readers why some scientific studies are taken more seriously than others by experts and the media.

Teachers and parents, you can download it here and print it for school or home use (no commercial uses allowed).

For more free printable posters, visit my boutique in the “free printable stuff” section. To see my books, click here. If you want to license this image, contact my agent (Contact form above).

Who is Ketanji Brown Jackson?

Let’s introduce Ketanji Brown Jackson to our kids. If she’s confirmed on April 4th, she will become the first Black woman on the Supreme Court of America.

Teachers and parents, you can download it here and print it for school or home use (no commercial uses allowed).

For more free printable posters, visit my boutique in the “free printable stuff” section. To see my books, click here. If you want to license this image, contact my agent (Contact form above).

It’s OK for boys to hug each other!

Here’s a free printable comic I made to teach kids (and many grownups) that hugging is for everyone, not just girls and moms. Boys should learn that physical affection feels good and that they can express it to each other (with consent, of course!)

Teachers and parents, you can download it here and print it for school or home use (no commercial uses allowed).

For more free printable posters, visit my boutique in the “free printable stuff” section. To see my books, click here. If you want to license this image, contact my agent (Contact form above).

Pink, Blue and You: my new book is in stores today!

My new book is in stores today! Let’s teach our kids that their gender shouldn’t define who they are, what they like and who they love. Buy it here!

Here’s a starred review from the School Library Journal:

“In her signature style, Gravel (What Is a Refugee? and others) and Blais provide an accessible introduction to gender and gender stereotypes. Beginning with smart, open-ended questions, the authors challenge readers to think about gender stereotypes, why they exist, and if they are true or fair. The book progresses to an overview of sex versus gender, complete with helpful visual aids, an exploration of pronouns, and ultimately, a few examples of how gender is treated in different communities. At each step, the authors ask readers what they think and how they feel. This engagement, coupled with the accessible presentation of the material, makes for an excellent resource. The folks depicted throughout vary in appearance, and include many skin tones, ages, and family structures. A few folks wear hijabs, and two others use wheelchairs. Gravel’s illustrative style is wildly appealing, and the comic-style presentation helps to endear the book to readers.

VERDICT: Thoughtful, engaging, and visually bright, this is an excellent addition to any library serving preschool and early elementary ages.”


Pink, Blue and You

Here’s my new book, written with Mykaell Blais. Pink, Blue and You: Questions for kids about gender stereotypes. You can preorder it HERE.

Here’s the starred review it got from the School Library Journal:

 PreS-Gr 2–In her signature style, Gravel (What Is a Refugee? and others) and Blais provide an accessible introduction to gender and gender stereotypes. Beginning with smart, open-ended questions, the authors challenge readers to think about gender stereotypes, why they exist, and if they are true or fair. The book progresses to an overview of sex versus gender, complete with helpful visual aids, an exploration of pronouns, and ultimately, a few examples of how gender is treated in different communities. At each step, the authors ask readers what they think and how they feel. This engagement, coupled with the accessible presentation of the material, makes for an excellent resource. The folks depicted throughout vary in appearance, and include many skin tones, ages, and family structures. A few folks wear hijabs, and two others use wheelchairs. Gravel’s illustrative style is wildly appealing, and the comic-style presentation helps to endear the book to readers.

 

Different ways to show kindness

Here’s a free printable comic I made to teach kids that there are many different ways to show kindness and to make people around you happier.

Teachers and parents, you can download it here and print it for school or home use (no commercial uses allowed).

Activity ideas for teachers:

• Ask your students to add other kind gestures and illustrate them.

• At the end of each day, ask your students to think of the ways they showed kindness and the ways they received it. This has the double benefit of reinforcing kindness and gratitude.

For more free printable posters, visit my boutique in the “free printable stuff” section. To see my books, click here. If you want to license this image, contact my agent (Contact form above).